RecoveryRadio.FM Review

These guys are all forces in the recovery community but together WOW, you can expect lots of inspiration, differences of opinions and thanks to Bobble every topic will be explained so that everyone will understand completely.

 

December 1st RECOVERYRADIO.FM went live out of Palm Beach, Florida. Three huge names in recovery are hosting the show, RJ ViedJames Sweasy and Bobble. These guys are all forces in the recovery community but together WOW, you can expect lots of inspiration, differences of opinions and thanks to Bobble every topic will be explained so that everyone will understand completely.

The show runs for three hours every Tuesday and Thursday from 9 pm to 11 pm on

96.1FM for Pompano to West Palm / 97.5FM for West Palm to Jupiter/ 1340AM for all of West Palm County. You can also watch the show live on RECOVERYRADIO.FM OR on Facebook at www.facebook.com/recoveryradio.fm

If you aren’t familiar with these guys, let me tell you a little about them from my perspective.

RJ Vied is a Recovery Advocate who is a talented writer, speaker and all around genuine guy. I guess you could say he is the eye candy of the show…at least that’s what all the ladies are saying but don’t take my word for it, check him out yourself. You can follow RJ Vied on Facebook at www.facebook.com/rjvied. Don’t think that means he is just pretty to look at, this guy has a genuine passion for reaching the addict still suffering and supporting those in recovery. RJ Vied is a triple threat, intelligent, talented and honorable. The eye candy part is just a bonus.

James Sweasy is one of those magnetic guys that when they talk you just know you need to listen. Sweasy is from my hometown Louisville, KY and his no-nonsense approach to recovery has made him one of the most followed Public Persona’s in Recovery, and he is just getting started. Sweasy’s fans are die hard and with Sweasy’s creative video angles and call it like it is approach this guy going to be HUGE…ok he already is huge so how about Enormous. Relatable is Sweasy’s middle name. If you aren’t a Sweasy Fan, you need to hope on over to www.facebook.com/jamessweasy and learn you a thing or two. That’s what us Kentuckiana’s like to say.

Last but not least is Bobble. Bobble is a musician that is rocking the recovery world with his relatable rhythms and hip hop recovery music. I don’t know a bunch about Bobbleother than thank goodness for him being on this show. Sure enough, when I am scratching my head about some odd term, idea or recovery approach Bobble is quick to say, HUH? Please explain that so we all can understand it. You can follow Bobble at www.facebook.com/bobblemuzikRAW

I am going to give www. recoveryradio.fm a ten on a scale of 1-10. If you missed the show last night, you could listen to it on their website www.recoveryradio.fm anytime.

Be sure to check out their next show every Tuesday and Thursday. They encourage people to call in but remember this isn’t a podcast so no swearing or you will be disconnected immediately.

RECOVERYRADIO.FM is a great concept with incredible talent, I look for this show to have a long successful run. Congrats guys, we will be listening, that is for sure.

Video Teen Takes Of Dad’s Heart Attack Goes Viral

Teen streams video of  Dad while he is having a heart attack on Facebook Live. The young man makes no apologies.  He says he wants the public to see what it’s like living in a home with a parent who doesn’t listen to doctors, continues to eat poorly, and refuses to exercise.  So when his father had yet another “episode” as he puts it,  Markus Adams decided to pick up his phone to record instead of dialing 911.

“You can hear his friends in the background making comments like ” eat another twinkie or bet you wish you exercised now.”  One of the teens in the house did call 911 after several minutes passed.”  

The first responder on the scene was a police officer who also decided to snap a few shots of the man who by this point had lost consciousness.   Once the EMT’s arrived on the scene, the patient was rushed to the hospital where he made a full recovery.

 

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The hospital released a statement saying: these overweight patients typically have Type 2 Diabetes as well as Heart Disease.  They have noticed that as soon these patients are stabilized they get up and leave the hospital.  An ER Doctor said the most concerning thing to him is that these overweight Diabetics with Heart Disease are stopping at the snack machines before they even make it out of the hospital.

Even after almost dying because of the choices they continue to make regarding nutrition, exercise, medication maintenance these food junkies make those same decisions.  These Junk Food Junkies practically run across the threshold of the hospital, so they can continue smoking after being told time and again that if they continue, they will die.

How do you feel about this story?  Is it right for anyone to record a medical emergency? What do you think about Police Officers taking photos of people that are in danger of dying instead of administering care and comfort at the very least until backup arrives?

We don’t see photos or stories like the one told above online or on our evening news because it’s wrong to exploit people who find themselves in a life or death situation due to a disease.   Unless of course, the person being photographed or videotaped suffers from Substance Use Disorder and is merely dying of an overdose.

When people make excuses for mistreatment of individuals with Substance Use Disorder one of their favorite arguments is the “it’s a choice.”  What about the person with Type 2 Diabetes that refuses to stop smoking, drinking, eating cake pops and who’s idea of exercise is walking to the fridge?

The hurtful words used in this article were only used to give an example of the harsh tones and words used when speaking about not only those who suffer from Substance Use Disorder but also when speaking to those who love someone with Substance Use Disorder.  It just goes to show that words hurt.

No matter what your opinion on Substance Use Disorder, it’s wrong to take photos and videos of people who are in need of medical care.  There is no doubt about that; wrong is wrong.

Note: The beginning of this story is fiction.  I also wish I didn’t need to use the awful terms I used to describe people who struggle with their weight but I felt it was necessary to drive home how individuals who have Substance Use Disorder are minimized and shamed in everyday conversation.  Please know I don’t use these terms and don’t think it is right to be mean to anyone.  

 

Property of Holy Addiction Inc @ www.holyaddiction.com. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

 

 

Newall: Twitter’s ‘bro dude’ becomes another heroin casualty

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Annie and Bob Reynolds are seen next to a family photo of them and their children Tom and Molly took a year earlier in the same spot in the backyard of their Flourtown home. Tom, 27, died from a heroin overdose in September.

Her thoughts have been so jumbled since Tom died. So shaky. It’s the little things that give her the most trouble. Like earlier Thursday at the Flourtown Farmers Market. She needed sandwiches for the guests that would be attending her son’s memorial Sunday. But at the counter, her mind went blank.

“I need help,” Annie Reynolds told the clerk. “I can’t even think straight.”

She is angry. She knows it’s irrational, but she’s angry at Tom. She’s angry that she and Bob couldn’t save him. She’s angry at the dealer who sold him the heroin, whoever that might be.

She’s angry about what Tom had told her that Sunday before he died. That he often had heroin delivered to his apartment, right there across from Bredenbeck’s Bakery in Chestnut Hill. That he could just call. It was that easy.

She sat down Thursday at her dining room table filled with photos and condolence cards. It had been nearly six weeks since Tom died from a heroin overdose in the bathroom of the Trolley Car Diner on Germantown Avenue. He was 27.

Annie Reynolds had wanted to talk to me about her son. Then, she didn’t. Then, she woke up one-morning last week feeling she had to talk about his death for what it was: another casualty of heroin’s insidious reach. Maybe that could bring some small dose of healing. Help her think straight. Help some other family.

“It’s not out there anymore,” she said of the heroin and opioid crisis tearing away at the small towns and suburbs across the nation. “It’s here and it has hit us really hard. By ‘us,’ I mean the community.”

Tom was the second member of the 2008 graduating class of Springfield Township High lost in the last 14 months from an overdose. A classmate died last summer. Fentanyl-laced heroin, same as Tom. Annie and the man’s mother now talk – about the four more young people they know from that class battling heroin. A girl in town who was the same age as their sons and recently Oded.

Annie, a retired Catholic school librarian, picked up a stack of photos from the table. “Scanned and ordered,” read a post-it. Molly Reynolds, who is 25, had meticulously organized the photos for a video for her older brother’s memorial.

“No one could make her laugh like him,” Annie said, showing a photo of Molly near tears from one of Tom’s jokes. He made so many laughs.

It was only weeks before Tom’s death that Annie learned about Tom’s devout Twitter audience of nearly 8,000 followers. Bob had tried to keep it from her; it could get raunchy.

A lot has been written about Tom’s Twitter account, @tombrodude. It was delightfully weird and absurdist, sometimes cutting and very often very raw. It was undeniably hilarious. Much of it was far better suited for Twitter than a Sunday newspaper, but it was undercut with sincerity and sweetness and vulnerability.

(“You know what today is. that’s right its Monday baby!,” his final tweet read, written hours before his death, on a Saturday. “let’s get out there and work our hardest and the weekend will be here before we know it.”)

He tweeted about his addiction. His openness made a lot of people who never met him love him. Now they mourn him. A “Tom Bro Dude Memorial Twitter Meet-Up” is scheduled for Saturday at Lucky Strike in Center City.

Those parallel rails of grief – between those who knew him in person and those who knew him online – shows how it is with heroin now. It could be the guy you love on Twitter. The guy who lives above a bakery and makes his sister laugh, who was raking leaves with his father at his church the day he died.

After leaving his father, he met a dealer near the World War I Memorial on Mermaid Lane. Tom rode his bike the few blocks to the Trolley Car and walked the winding hallway to the bathroom, past the old-timey trolley photos and the Cat on the Tin Roof poster to a corner stall. His heart gave out. A cook found him.

At the table Thursday, Annie’s braced herself for her son’s memorial. For what she might say. Maybe a Shel Silverstein poem, she said. Something funny and pithy and intelligent. Like, Tom.

Then, she went back to preparing for the guests who were coming to help her bury her son. Tried to make her way through the little things.

Op-Ed: Noticing Heroin Addiction Warning Signs

Op-Ed: Noticing heroin addiction warning signs

As director of Alcohol and Other Drug Education Program for UW Colleges, including UW-Manitowoc, I’m frequently asked about the growing problem of heroin addiction and what can be done.

Since I am a prevention educator, I often frame my response in terms of what each of us can do as individuals, family members and friends to prevent the evolution of addiction from happening to those we care about.

Heroin addiction doesn’t happen overnight. For many users, the journey to addiction starts with a legitimate prescription for opiate pain medication and evolves from there. If we understand what this evolution looks like, we are more equipped to notice warning signs, ask questions and get help sooner.

If a patient uses pain medication for a short period of time, as prescribed by a doctor, the likelihood of developing an addiction remains fairly low. Over time, however, people who use opiate pain medication start to develop tolerance. If patients begin to notice their prescribed amount of medication doesn’t seem to work as well anymore, they should speak to their doctor. Many alternatives to pain management besides long-term opiate use are available.

Warning Sign 1 — The individual starts taking larger amounts of pain medication on their own, without consulting a doctor. This is drug abuse. Now is the best time to intervene to prevent further progression toward addiction.

When individuals are taking more than prescribed, they need to increase their supply. That can include getting refills legally at first but often involves finding alternative ways to maintain their supply.

Most prescription drug abusers report getting additional supply from friends and family by asking for it, buying it or stealing it. Sharing prescription drugs is illegal and can contribute to addiction.

You can reduce the risk of drug abuse by dropping off unused prescription medications to a drug drop box. Manitowoc and Two Rivers police departments have permanent drop boxes available at their stations. If you have medications at home, keep them hidden or locked in a safe location.

Warning Sign 2 — The individual is taking prescription drugs that are not prescribed to them.

As the needed dose increases, costs go up and availability of supply can become challenging for individuals. Users also experience withdrawal symptoms if they go too long without opiates.

Warning Sign 3 — Feeling sick when not using opiates.

When experiencing painful withdrawal or pill supply issues, individuals are at high risk for turning to heroin, which is often cheaper and more potent.

Initially, users who turn to heroin may experience a rush in a way they haven’t experienced with prescription drugs for a while. This can be very appealing and increases their desire to continue using heroin.

Warning Sign 4 — Heroin is typically not a recreational drug. If someone is using heroin, it is often an indicator of opiate addiction.

The sooner we — as individuals, parents, family members and friends — recognize warning signs and admit what they are, the more likely early intervention can happen.

Thankfully, growing numbers of multi-agency efforts are happening across our communities and throughout the state. Positive changes are happening legislatively as well as with prevention, intervention, and after-care support services.

We are moving in the right direction.

Wendy Seegers is director of Prevention Programs for the University of Wisconsin Colleges.

Open Letter to the Addict Haters

Dear Addict Haters:

Hello, you don’t know me but I am an addict.  I am one of the “junkies” you love to bash whenever someone mentions addiction on Social Media or hear it in conversation.  I know it’s hard to forgive the things we sometimes do because of our addiction but I have a question for you.

WHAT IS THE WORST THING YOU HAVE EVER DONE?

Obviously, I won’t get an answer to this question but think about it.  The thing that you hate that you did.  You know, that one thing that not too many people even know about. Well, what if everyone knew about it.  What if for the rest of your life you were labeled by that one act that you would erase in a second if you had the chance?

That is what being an addict is like, kind of.  Now I don’t feel like being an addict is the worst thing a person can be or do.  You, however, feel like it’s a terrible thing.   Don’t get me wrong, if I could erase it from my life I would.  In an instant, it would be gone, but I don’t have that option.  I can’t even do what you do and pretend that this thing I did, didn’t happen. In order for me to ensure it never happens again I have to work hard on making sure it doesn’t. If I don’t my disease will tell me I can have a drink or do a line and not fall back into full-blown addiction, but I will.

DO YOU WORK HARD TO MAKE SURE YOUR WORST THING NEVER HAPPENS AGAIN?

Let me guess, you are thinking, addiction is not a disease…it’s a choice, right?

 Yes, all addiction starts with a choice.

The same damn choice you made when you were young and hanging out with friends.

You drank the same beer I drank.

The same pot I smoked.

You even tried the same line of white stuff someone put in front of you at a party.

You were able to walk away and not take it to the extreme.

Since I have the disease, I will spend the rest of my life either struggling to stay high or fighting to stay clean.

As  children, we don’t decide we would rather be an addict instead of a cop.

You don’t see children pretending that their dolls and stuffed animals are dope sick.

When is the last time you talked to a little girl that told you she couldn’t wait to grow up so she could turn tricks to feed the insatiable hunger of her drug addiction?

My best friend didn’t tell me about exciting  plans to become homeless.

My Dad, not one time, told my Mother to think twice before marrying him because he had high hopes of becoming an angry drunk.

My sister in law didn’t blow out her candles as a child wishing for an  S.U.D.  ( Substance Use Disorder ) because she couldn’t wait for the day her children were taken into foster care.

Nobody WANTS to have Substance Use Disorder.

Some of us just do.

So always remember –

YOU MADE THOSE

SAME CHOICES TOO

YOU JUST GOT LUCKY

IT WAS ME

AND NOT YOU.

If you still have doubts you can take those up with the Center for Disease Control ( CDC ) or the United States Surgeon General.  Since they have classified addiction as a disease, but then again I am sure you know more about it than they do, right

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So to you, I pray that you don’t have to reevaluate these opinions because you find out your child or parent is an addict.  If you do, just know that we will accept you into our community. We will help your loved one.  Do you know why we would do that?  Because we are good people that just want the chance to live like everyone else.

So please, before you post another post bashing people who are suffering think about it. Not only are you hurting the people who, have the disease, you could be hurting everyone that loves them.  You have people on your friend’s lists or that overhear you at work who have children who are suffering right this moment from addiction.  What did they do to deserve the awful things you put out into the universe, that does nothing but perpetuate hate and judgment?

You have a right to your opinion, but no matter what, hurting people is wrong.