Father speaks out after losing his son to heroin

BOISE, Idaho – A Boise family was hoping their 19-year-old son was about to turn his life around. Charles Peyton Chambers was a heroin addict but wanted help. But before he crossed that bridge to recovery, he passed away from a heroin overdose in October. Days before he was supposed to leave for a Salt Lake City rehab center, police found Peyton had died from a heroin overdose. His death left a gaping hole in his family and friends.

Growing up Peyton loved the outdoors.  His dad, Charles Senior, fondly remembers spending time together white-water rafting. Barely a year out of high school, the Boise Brave, shot up and overdosed on heroin. Peyton was dead at 19.

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“You’re not invincible. That drug is so much stronger than you, and it doesn’t matter what color you are, what age you are. It will take you down,” said Charles Chamber, Peyton’s dad.

Peyton’s dad says his son’s appetite for drugs was intense. It started with him snorting highly addictive prescription opioids. When that rush faded, he started shooting up heroin daily. According to Chambers, his son was on a slippery slope, and he says Peyton was dead less than 100-days after he first experimented with opioids.

“There was no downward spiral it was like a giant slide, straight down,” explained Chambers.

Doctors at Saint Alphonsus say the time it takes for a person to become addicted varies. But it can happen in just weeks, and then the only thing that matters is their next fix.

“Their euphoria and their feeling of high and relaxation is wearing off and that’s what they are looking for by using so close to again,” said Dr. Kari Peterson an E.R. physician at Saint Alphonsus

Ada County prosecutors charged 29-year-old Tommy Basco in connection to Peyton’s death. Saying when Peyton overdosed, Basco tried to revive him by giving him an ice bath and meth. He’s now facing charges for failing to report his death.  Doctors say what could have saved Peyton’s life is the drug Naloxone. E.M.T’s and many police officers carry it with them; it’s even available without a prescription. But Charles didn’t know about the life-saving drug and neither do many others.

“It’s also helpful when we see patients in the emergency department we know have opiate addiction issues we can be prescribing naloxone to them just to have.  Just getting the word is the biggest,” said Dr. Peterson.

But Peyton, never made it to the hospital, and Charles is wishing Peyton could hear these words.

“I love you so much I was always proud of you, even when you thought I wasn’t. I was proud of you,” said Chambers.

Basco is expected to be in front of a judge on December 1st.  His bond has been set at $100,000.

Source:

Angel Warrior, Daris Patrick Fent

The heartbreak that Melissa Dye and her surviving children have endured because of Daris’ senseless death has created an unstoppable force. Melissa still struggles with the loss of her son, but she is also determined to try to save someone else’s child.

Daris Patrick Fent isn’t the stereotypical drug user.  ” I am a Marine, I am meant to save lives, be proud of that,” said Daris to his mother, Melissa Dye.  The best way to describe Daris in the early stages of addiction is that he was able to function when after his doctor in the Military prescribed him Oxycontin after a minor injury.  Daris was not just a  manly Marine; he was a sensitive musician too.  If Daris tried something he was good at it.  He was just that kind of young man.

 

 

screen-shot-2016-11-22-at-6-44-42-pmNo one in his family, nor the Marines noticed any signs of drug use until the pain meds he was getting from the doctor stopped coming.  Daris like so many others felt he had no other choice but to move to heroin which is cheaper and more accessible than prescription medications.

It didn’t take long once heroin entered Daris’ life for the signs to start to show.  Melissa, Daris’ mom, came across test messages between Daris’ brother and his girlfriend where they talked about the time he spent in the bathroom and mentioned Daris falling asleep in the middle of a text message.   His mother didn’t have any proof but confronted him and said “I know you’re doing drugs,” he immediately broke down, begging for help.  Over and over he kept saying “I don’t know why I can’t stop, I just want my life back.” That night Melissa stayed up all night surfing the Internet, looking for rehabs and resources only to come up empty-handed.  Like so many parents she didn’t know where to turn.There was one facility with a bed for him, private pay only and I had no choice but to take out a private loan to try and save my son’s life.

Melissa found one facility with an available bed.  It was a private center that Melissa had to take a loan out to get Daris into the facility.  At Liberty Ranch, Daris was too close to home and all of his connections.  Daris began leaving the center and had a tough time dealing with the rules.  Melissa says she doesn’t blame the treatment center; she believes that a more faith-based program would have fit Daris better.  One of his regular reassurances to his mom about his condition was ” God will see me through this.” Daris had a strong faith and Melissa wishes she could have found a faith-based program for him.

When your child is using a substance like heroin you know that at any moment your entire life can change.  With fentanyl being added to heroin more often than not, parents are living their lives in agonizing fear of losing their child to this disease.  Melissa was no different.  On August 14th Melissa joined an ever-growing group of families that have lost one of their most precious gems to a drug overdose.  Daris had been doing very well.  He was working out at the gym when he made plans to meet his mom at his sister’s basketball game.  One of his old using buddies approached him at the gym and asked Daris to come hang out.  On their way to the friend’s house, they bought heroin.  It is estimated that Daris took his final dose of heroin around 10:30 am, at about 11 his “friend” called a friend and told them that Daris was unconscious.  Unfortunately, even after he was told to call 911 he waited, at 3:10 another call was placed to the friend at which time he admitted that he hadn’t called 911 and now he was talking about dumping Daris in a ditch somewhere.  After hearing this kid on the other end of the conversation called 911.  By then it was too late, Daris had suffered severe brain damage from lack of oxygen.  Thankfully Daris gave his mother the gift of three days where Melissa was able to cuddle up next to her son, breathe his scent and tell him how much everyone loved him.  Melissa held him looking at her beautiful son as he took his last breath.

 

The heartbreak that Melissa Dye and her surviving children have endured because of Daris’ senseless death has created an unstoppable force.  Melissa still struggles with the loss of her son, but she is also determined to try to save someone else’s child.  Project Daris, is a team made up of medical professionals that offer a FREE program to Kentucky and surrounding States schools. Melissa takes Project Daris into schools and provides drug education, K-12,  on the subject of current drugs that are being abused and misused.

Melissa’s team is determined to counter the glorified messages kids see and hear on social media. Daris’s story is told to the students, and they watch his memorial video.  Project Daris works with guest speakers which include people in recovery and parents that have also dealt with a child suffering from Substance Use Disorder. 

When asked what her main goal was Melissa was quick to say, “My primary purpose is to put drug education back into schools.  Drug education needs to be part of the curriculum; our children deserve to learn the life skills to avoid drugs. I believe this is where we can make the biggest impact.  We’ll never be able to keep the drugs or dealers off the street, but we can educate our children in the truths of drug use and abuse!”

I then asked Melissa what advice would she give families facing this situation in their children and she said, “I didn’t have the tools or knowledge to save my son, become educated! Don’t believe in tough love or rock bottom; the bottom was my son’s death.”

Recently, after visiting a school, Melissa got an email from the parent of one of the students that saw Melissa’s story at school.  This is what the email said:

Project Daris

Melissa:

I wanted to let you know that my son, who is a 14 yr old Freshman, was present in the assembly at Montgomery County High School when you spoke yesterday. He was very emotional telling me about your son’s life and his death. I am a drug counselor. We have people in our family who are in recovery, and have even lost many loved ones due to addiction including my mother-in-law in 2005, my best friend, who was like my brother and an uncle to my children; he died last year on my wedding anniversary, and my little sister lost her best friend only two months ago due to using heroin that had been laced with Carfentanil. We also come from a family of substantial military personnel including the Navy, Army, and United Stated Marine Corp., so there were many things about your life that struck home with my son. First, I want to offer to you my sincerest condolences for the loss of your child. Thank you for your child’s sacrifice for our country and our freedom, and thank you for your sacrifice as a military mom. I want to thank you mostly for sharing Daris’ story. Even though I try always to be very honest and real with him, my son was surprised by Daris’ age, talent, and Military service knowing that he died from an overdose. I know it can’t be easy to do this, but I want you to know that you made an impact on my son, and I am grateful for that. Tonight we sat together and listened to Daris sing songs on YouTube, and we cried together as we watched his memorial service. There are no words that I can say to relieve the pain of losing your child, and so I will not try to come up with any. I wanted only to thank you for taking the time to try to save other kids, MY CHILD, from the same desperation that I know Daris must have felt and that you must feel now. My heart breaks for you, but I am so grateful that you are using this as an opportunity to help heal our communities. Thank you, just doesn’t seem to be enough. Sincerely,

Mary Smith

Letters like this one are all the payment that someone like Melissa Dye needs to continue working nonstop to make sure that she does her best to keep any other mother from going through the nightmare that she and her family have endured.  Daris didn’t have to die.  If his “friend” would have just dialed 911 as soon as he noticed there was a problem, Daris would still be here.  Daris Patrick Fent was an all-American boy, who was talented, loving, intelligent and kind.  His life mattered the same way your child’s life matters.  Daris was right about one thing.  He was a Marine; he was meant to save lives, and his mother is very proud of that.

To learn more about Project Daris visit their Facebook page at:

https://www.facebook.com/projectdaris/?fref=ts

If you would like to get Project Daris into your School go to their Facebook page and send Melissa Dye a message.  This is a free service.

Video Teen Takes Of Dad’s Heart Attack Goes Viral

Teen streams video of  Dad while he is having a heart attack on Facebook Live. The young man makes no apologies.  He says he wants the public to see what it’s like living in a home with a parent who doesn’t listen to doctors, continues to eat poorly, and refuses to exercise.  So when his father had yet another “episode” as he puts it,  Markus Adams decided to pick up his phone to record instead of dialing 911.

“You can hear his friends in the background making comments like ” eat another twinkie or bet you wish you exercised now.”  One of the teens in the house did call 911 after several minutes passed.”  

The first responder on the scene was a police officer who also decided to snap a few shots of the man who by this point had lost consciousness.   Once the EMT’s arrived on the scene, the patient was rushed to the hospital where he made a full recovery.

 

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The hospital released a statement saying: these overweight patients typically have Type 2 Diabetes as well as Heart Disease.  They have noticed that as soon these patients are stabilized they get up and leave the hospital.  An ER Doctor said the most concerning thing to him is that these overweight Diabetics with Heart Disease are stopping at the snack machines before they even make it out of the hospital.

Even after almost dying because of the choices they continue to make regarding nutrition, exercise, medication maintenance these food junkies make those same decisions.  These Junk Food Junkies practically run across the threshold of the hospital, so they can continue smoking after being told time and again that if they continue, they will die.

How do you feel about this story?  Is it right for anyone to record a medical emergency? What do you think about Police Officers taking photos of people that are in danger of dying instead of administering care and comfort at the very least until backup arrives?

We don’t see photos or stories like the one told above online or on our evening news because it’s wrong to exploit people who find themselves in a life or death situation due to a disease.   Unless of course, the person being photographed or videotaped suffers from Substance Use Disorder and is merely dying of an overdose.

When people make excuses for mistreatment of individuals with Substance Use Disorder one of their favorite arguments is the “it’s a choice.”  What about the person with Type 2 Diabetes that refuses to stop smoking, drinking, eating cake pops and who’s idea of exercise is walking to the fridge?

The hurtful words used in this article were only used to give an example of the harsh tones and words used when speaking about not only those who suffer from Substance Use Disorder but also when speaking to those who love someone with Substance Use Disorder.  It just goes to show that words hurt.

No matter what your opinion on Substance Use Disorder, it’s wrong to take photos and videos of people who are in need of medical care.  There is no doubt about that; wrong is wrong.

Note: The beginning of this story is fiction.  I also wish I didn’t need to use the awful terms I used to describe people who struggle with their weight but I felt it was necessary to drive home how individuals who have Substance Use Disorder are minimized and shamed in everyday conversation.  Please know I don’t use these terms and don’t think it is right to be mean to anyone.  

 

Property of Holy Addiction Inc @ www.holyaddiction.com. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

 

 

Family Loses Third Son To The Heroin Epidemic

Three beautiful young men, all from the same family are just gone. It’s not the leading story on the news and the comments below this story will include horrible judgment and hate. All because these wonderful young men have a disease that people have decided make them less than.

Losing one child to an overdose is devastating, imagine losing your third.  Jeanmarie McCauley is having to bury her third son, Jesse.  In the go fund me summary they wrote:

I can’t believe that I am having to do this again.  Jeanmarie McCauley is having to bury her third child, Jesse.  He was a big-hearted kid who was so lost after both of his brothers died. He went to Florida to try and get his life back.  Sadly, he did not make it.  I can’t imagine the pain she and the rest of the family are in.  She has to come up with the burial expenses as well as the added cost of bringing him back from Florida.   She wants to have the three brothers together in their final resting place.  We would be so grateful for any help. No mother should have to go through this.  She and her family appreciate all the love and support they have received.

If this story is not proof that our Country is in the midst of an epidemic, what more will it take?  It was only a few months ago that a mother that runs the page I HATE HEROIN, on Facebook lost two of her sons in the same night.  Both of these mothers are fighters that actively fight to spread the word about this epidemic in hopes that no other mother will have to endure the pain of  having a child who suffers from Substance Use Disorder, much less losing a one.

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When this happens to families that are knowledgeable about this illness and actively fighting it, it just goes to show how powerful it truly is.  So what does that mean?  It means that we as Mothers and Fathers cannot do this alone.  We need the full support of our police forces, judges, politicians, and communities.

When one of our loved ones gets picked up for possession or petty theft and it’s evident to the arresting officer that they are using opiates that person needs to be taken into custody. Not just for a few hours until they are let back out to wait for court.  The presiding judge needs to look over his podium and imagine it’s their  child standing in front of them. They need to recognize that this is their chance to possibly save a life.

Why can’t they be held until a bed somewhere can be found?  We know if they are released that the first thing they will do is whatever it takes to get high.  They can’t help it, it’s a disease.  So that means if they have to steal something out of your garage or sell their bodies they will make the money it takes to feed the disease that is doing everything in its power to kill them.  If the judge knew they were going to leave and commit suicide they wouldn’t let them go.  What is the difference?

The politicians need to pass laws that make it possible for judges and police officers to take advantage of these opportunities to save our loved one’s lives.  I know this is America and typically we allow adults to make mistakes and then learn on their own from them. This isn’t the same.  Many of these people won’t get the chance to learn from their mistakes, they don’t live long enough to.  Don’t you see, this isn’t like smoking pot, doing a line or having a drink?  You don’t have two, three or five years to screw up and decide that you want to get clean.  With the Fentanyl and now Carfentanil every single time they use might be their last.

15000006_10210938704172944_4691463102048334425_oThree beautiful young men, all from the same family are just gone.  It’s not the leading story on the news and the comments below this story will include horrible judgment and hate.  All because these beautiful young men have a disease that people have decided makes them less than.  I can promise you this. Those boys were loved, their lives mattered and their families feelings matter.  Please, take a stand.  If you love someone who suffers from Substance Use Disorder don’t be scared to speak out. You hold the keys, all of you.  If we all stand together and tell our stories we can stomp out this stigma and force the public to take notice.  Those of us who fight every day need you.  Together we can make a change.

Please give to the go fund me for this family and if you can’t afford to give you can surely share.

https://www.gofundme.com/jesse-mccauley-memorial-fund

Update: Thank you for your generous donations, please keep them coming for this family.  Because of all of you this mother might get to bring her son back home from Florida and allow him to rest beside the brothers he loved so much in life.   Every little bit helps.

JoJo Tears Up Over Late Father’s Addiction Battle: It ‘Broke’ My Family — But ‘I Just Couldn’t Give Up on Him’

“I knew my dad was struggling with narcotics when I was 11, 12,” the singer, 25, said in the moving clip, in which she reveals her father had to quit working and go on unemployment after becoming disabled

JoJo is sharing her family’s harrowing battle with addiction in hopes her story will save others from the same heartbreak.

The “F— Apologies” singer — who released her new triumphant new album Mad Love. last month — is participating in Vevo’s “Why I Vote” video series, in which celebrities including Kesha, John Legend and Andra Day discuss issues that have affected them personally and how seeking reform is driving them to the polls next Tuesday.

“I knew my dad was struggling with narcotics when I was 11, 12,” the singer, 25, said in the moving clip, in which she reveals her father had to quit working and go on unemployment after becoming disabled when she was a child. “After he stopped working is when he really got into narcotics. I never knew why he was out of it or why he would fall asleep at the wheel or why he would slur his words. I didn’t understand that, and my mom kept that from me because she didn’t want to upset me and she didn’t want me to look at him in a certain way, and I really respect that.”

JoJo has talked about her parents’ struggle with addiction over the past year, recently opening up to PEOPLE about her own drinking problem.
JOJO SPEAKS ABOUT HER DAD DYING OF ADDICTION
In the clip, she said her father’s dependency on narcotics put a strain on their relationship, and they were even estranged for times.

“I got a call when I was in L.A. that my dad had overdosed for the…I don’t know what number time it was and that he wasn’t gonna make it,” JoJo said, recalling a relapse in recent years that led to her to return to her native New Hampshire to visit him in the hospital.

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“He was hooked up to a bunch of machines, and he had fallen, and he was out of it; he didn’t know what was going on,” she said, getting emotional and tearing up in the clip. “Me and my aunts had discussed what we were gonna do this time: We were gonna practice tough love, and we were gonna cut him off because it was too much for us as a family to keep going through. But I looked at him and saw him hooked up to these machines, and I just couldn’t give up on him…that’s my one dad. I just couldn’t do it. In that moment, I felt, who am I to give up on you. I just decided that I was gonna love him, and I’m really glad I did.”

I missed you even while you were here. I will miss you infinitely more now that you’re gone. Thank you for holding on as long as you did. I know you tried your best. You are free now. I will love you always, Dad. I can feel you with me. Rest now. In PEACE. I miss your voice. I wish more people could have heard it. I promise I will keep singing for you. Joel
A year ago, JoJo announced that her father had succumbed to his demons and died at the age of 60, and today she’s speaking out to call for reform in how people struggling with addiction and drug abuse handled.

“I don’t feel that he had the resources or the tools available to him to help himself. I don’t want other families to be broken up and have their lives ruined as a result of addiction,” she added. “I really, really do think that there are ways to help. Throwing an addict in jail is not doing anything to help the problem…We’re wasting our money, we’re misusing our resources, and I think we’re hurting ourselves. It’s important to elect politicians who will make a difference with drug abuse and addiction because it’s affecting all of us.”

The singer added: “It’s hard, I guess, to have sympathy for a lot of drug addicts because we think that it’s their fault or they asked for it or something, but you do not ask to have your life shaken up that way and to have everything taken from you. That’s what addiction does: It strips everything from you…

“I see the way I lost my own father to addiction—and it makes me sad that people feel so distraught that they risk it all and end up losing everything.”

 

 

BY @NELSON_JEFF

http://people.com/music/jojo-why-i-vote-video-dads-addiction-broke-family/

What it Was Like Then, and What It’s Like Now

After my rehab stay I moved back home. My mom was very skeptical of me living in the house because my teenage years were a disaster. I assured her that no matter what, I will not use, steal or lie to her. She slowly began to trust me again, which I never thought possible.

Today’s guest blogger, Benny Emerling, got sober at 19. It’s valuable for parents and professionals to have this perspective in mind when working with young people. MWM

As a young kid, I always felt like everyone around me was given a golden textbook on life. Mine must have gotten lost in the mail. I was different, but not an outcast, in fact. quite the opposite. I had many friends, a loving family and a decently smart head on my shoulders. However, my idea of fun was different from most of my peers. Misbehaving, stealing and bullying were some of my favorite activities. I was always a happy jokester and had a smile on my face the majority of the time.

Having three older sisters and a younger brother, it was easy to slip through the cracks and get away with murder. In middle school, my behavior got worse and worse. I grew up in a primarily Jewish area, so when I was in seventh grade every weekend we had a bar or bat mitzvah party to go to. Virtually, every weekend there was a different elaborate party to go to. After a couple, I noticed the adults at the parties drinking. Curiosity grew inside me, it looked awesome. It was not long before I tried drinking.

I was 13, one of my friends at the time made me a delicious alcoholic beverage. By delicious, I mean repulsive, it was a combination of anything he could grab off the adult tables. This included wine, beer, a shot and a mixed drink. It was the most disgusting beverage I had ever had but at the same time the best. I felt the buzz of alcohol for the first time in my life and I was instantly ready for more.

Drinking at these parties became the norm for me and a couple of friends. Weirdly enough, none of us ever got caught. Then the summer hit, growing up every year I went to sleep away camp in Northern Michigan. And this year at summer camp was monumental, one of my cabin mates brought weed to camp with him and I smoke it for the first time. Drinking was a blast, but weed was a different type of fun. I finally found the missing piece to my life, and it was drugs. After my first experience getting high, I never wanted to be sober.

I became a huge pothead by ninth grade. I had drug hookups because my sister was older, and I was friends with kids who sold pot, among other drugs. Smoking weed became an everyday habit before school, at lunch, sometimes between classes, and always after school. Weed took over my life. I quit all after school activities I once did because it got in the way of me smoking weed.

Smoking weed is an expensive habit, so how could I afford it? I stole, manipulated, worked little jobs and sold drugs.

My first job was at an elite men’s fashion store that sold thousand dollar suits and top of the line shoes. I couldn’t stop smoke weed and I dabbled a little with taking prescription pills. I didn’t want to get fired, especially because of speculation about me being high at work was on the rise. I came up with what I thought was a brilliant lie: I told my boss who knew my stepmom that I was allergic to wool and that was why my eyes were constantly bloodshot.

I didn’t last long at this job, to say the least. I picked up a caddying job that summer, but no money compared to selling pills. So after a couple of months I made my money exclusively selling prescription pills and little amounts of weed. My supplier? My family. Members of family were prescribed prescription pills for medical reasons. I looked at these pills as dollar signs. My family gained suspicion. They knew I didn’t have a job, but they also knew I had a lot of money. Oh yeah, and all of the pills in the house were missing.

It didn’t take long for my parents to catch me red-handed. I was forced to take my first drug test, which I failed miserably.

It was then my parents started looking up local rehabilitation centers. When I was 16, I was put into my first outpatient treatment center. I was told I had to stay sober and there would be drug tests once a week. I tried to stay clean for about a month and decided it wasn’t for me.

My high school career could be summed up pretty easily, I got high and partied, then ended up in outpatient treatment. Maintained decent grades and did what I wanted, when I wanted—I thought it was the greatest time of my life. However, I knew the best years were still to come…college.

I chose to go to the biggest party college I got accepted to. The first couple of weeks were exactly how I wanted them to be. Huge parties every day, drugs whenever I wanted, and unlimited freedom to do whatever I wanted, without any consequences.Or so I thought…

The fun lasted about two months then I hit what most people would consider a bottom. I didn’t sleep, eat, go to class, and barely left my dorm room for five consecutive days. I ended up going insane from all of the Adderall I took, and it wasn’t long before I overdosed and ended up in the psych-ward.

By this time I hadn’t talked to my families in over a month, and everyone assumed I was either dead or in jail. My close friends stopped calling me because I betrayed all of them in one way or another and I was basically alone, miserable and physically and mentally broken.

I remember the exact moment when I realized I needed help and that I needed to get sober.

I was sitting in the psych-ward, I hadn’t slept for two days straight, and then I looked in the mirror. I was 40 pounds underweight, my eyes were sunk into my face and my body was bruised up from trying escape the hospital. At that very moment, I made the decision to get sober.

What’s It Like Now?

This was over six years ago. I was 19 when I admitted myself into treatment. I thought my rehab stay was only going to be three months, but I ended up needing a nine month stay. Rehab was great because I learned how to be a human again. I learned how to maintain relationships, grocery shop and take care of myself. I was taken to AA meetings and I actually learned from them and received hope from them.

I finally started feeling good for the first time in over six years.

After my rehab stay I moved back home. My mom was very skeptical of me living in the house because my teenage years were a disaster. I assured her that no matter what, I will not use, steal or lie to her. She slowly began to trust me again, which I never thought possible. I started paying back the people I owed money to, and I kept up with AA meetings. It didn’t take long before I found a friend group, all young, sober adults.

I realized the more meetings I went to, the more I hung out with my sober friends and the more time I spent helping others, the less I obsessed about myself or getting high. It was an incredible realization, for over five years, every waking moment I thought about my next fix and how I was going to achieve it. But after I came to terms with the fact that I will never be able to use like a normal person, my life was shot into what I call the fourth-dimension.

I got sober when I was 19, I am currently 25 years-old and couldn’t be in a better place.

The disease of addiction took me to the darkest world imaginable, but at the same time blessed me with an amazing one at the same time. Suffering from addiction has made me a better person. I wake up every day knowing that as long as I stay sober, I can accomplish anything.

Guest blog posts are welcome additions to the content on this website. Guest blog posts represent the views, opinions and experiences of the author and do not necessarily represent Our Young Addicts. Together, we provide parents and professionals with a variety of perspectives and information.

©2016 Our Young Addicts All Rights Reserved.

https://ouryoungaddicts.com/2016/11/03/what-it-was-like-then-and-what-its-like-now/

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Officials: Local man given probation after beating wife’s heroin dealer with bat

LOCKBOURNE, OH (WCMH)–As communities continue to deal with a heroin epidemic, one local man took the law into his own hands and beat a heroin addict nearly to death.

His punishment was probation, and some in the community said they support him.

NBC4 dug into the facts behind the sentence.

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Edwin-Tony-sobonyIt was at a Decker Street home in Lockbourne on December 9 when Edwin “Tony” Sobony 38, beat a man severely with a baseball bat after authorities said the man continued to share heroin with Sobony’s wife.

Sobony was convicted in September by a Franklin County Court jury for felonious assault, and the judge in the case gave him two years’ probation.

Presiding Judge Charles Schneider said he examined all the facts in the case along with a presentence report and Sobony’s spotless record.

“So, I took all those things into consideration and overcame the presumption and I am comfortable with my decision,” Judge Schneider said.

But he reminds people they cannot take the law into their own hands.

“I in no way support what Mr. Sobony did, I appreciate the frustration, but that does not support or condone vigilante justice,” the judge said.

Since his conviction, Sobony has gotten hundreds of letters and online comments supporting him and what he did.

A Lockbourne neighbor who know Sobony and his victim said, “I know what he did looks horrible on him, but if people would realize what he did was to protect his children. And those children’s lives mean more than anything to me.”

But, a village Councilwoman said she does not condone violence.

“I can understand Tony’s frustration, but nobody and I don’t care who or what you have done deserves to be beaten to a pulp with a ball bat,” said Jenny Lozier.

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NBC4 spoke with the victim and he admits to being a heroin addict, but says his skull was split open, 11 teeth of his teeth were knocked out and he is blind in one eye. He said he does not think the crime fits the punishment.

Lozier said this could have been avoided.

“We love our village and just want it to be cleaned up,” she said. “And if we call law enforcement, we would like to see something get done.”

Before his conviction, the judge said Sobony told jurors he acted a little aggressively but was just trying to protect his family.

Published: November 3, 2016, 5:47 pm

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